The “Wright” Translation

Derek Ouellette —  April 26, 2011 — 1 Comment

By now word is getting around quick. I wanted to wait until after Easter to post on a non-Easter themed subject. I first read about this from Michael Bird’s blog who had heard about it from Mark Stevens.

Apparently N.T. Wright will be coming out with his own translation of the New Testament in November 2011. As Bird jokes, it’s not going to be called the N.T.W. Translation. According to the publisher, HarperOne, it is called “The Kings Version” (HT: Chorus of Echoes) which has an air of irony to it: Wright, an Anglican scholar from the people who brought us the King James Version; as if to say this translation is not dedicated to the King (or Queen) of England, but to the King of kings.

HarperOne’s discription of the new New Testament is as follows:

Most readers of the New Testament have grown overly familiar with the biblical text, losing sight of the wonder and breadth of its innovative ideas and world-changing teachings about the life and role of Jesus of Nazareth. Wright now offers an all-new English translation that allows us to encounter afresh these historic works. The original Greek text is vibrant, alive, and active, and Wright’s translation retains that spirit by providing a new English text for the twenty-first-century reader. At the same time, based on his work as a pioneering interpreter of the Bible, Wright also corrects other translations so as to provide more accurate representations of the original writers’ intent. (Here)

Wright has a commentary series called “For Everyone”. The layout is similar to many commentaries in that a portion of the biblical text is placed in the commentary followed by a commentary on that portion of the text. What makes Wright’s commentary unique (aside from the obvious that the the commentary is his commentary) is that the biblical text in Wright’s commentary is his own translation. So, of example, if you read Hebrews for Everyone you would get N.T. Wrights complete translation of the book of Hebrews within the commentary.

Using his commentaries they have put his translations into one volume and voilà, a New Testament.

As a side note: he’s also coming out with a new book on Jesus titled, Simply Jesus in September.

Derek Ouellette

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a husband, new dad, speaker, writer, christian. see my profile here.